October 23, 2018

 Todd Greentree

The flow of migrants from Central America is a serious issue, but the United States is not suffering a general crisis of illegal immigration.  Let’s talk facts and distinguish between good politics and bad policy. Much of this is common sense. Other nations do not “send” their worst people to the United States, rather the U.S. remains a beacon for citizens of other nations who are seeking better lives for many reasons. The total number of unauthorized immigrants in the U.S.has actually declined from its peak of 12.2 million in 2007.More Mexicans are returning home than are coming into to the U.S, a trend that began in 2009 and which job growth from NAFTA has reinforced. MS-13, the gang that Trump loves to hate, spawned in the jails of Los Angeles, not the streets of San Salvador.

The surge of people fleeing violence in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras has its roots in the U.S.-backed civil wars of the 1980s, the “low quality” democracies that have resulted in the succeeding decades, and drug trafficking that transits Central America on the way to the U.S. Research generally shows that the crime rate among illegal immigrants is lower than the general population, and is even lower among legal immigrants. The principal implication is that solutions will come not by building a wall or draconian enforcement, but rather though a combination of effective border security, foreign assistance, and legislation that regularizes the flow of human beings into the country as well as the status of those who are here now.

Todd GreentreeA former U.S. Foreign Service Officer, Todd Greentree has served in five wars, from El Salvador in the early 1980s to Afghanistan between 2008 and 2012. 

Mr. Greentree graduated from the University of California Santa Cruz, received his master’s degree in International Studies from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), and his doctorate in history from Oxford University. He has taught Strategy and Policy at the Naval War College and the University of New Mexico and was a Visiting Scholar at the SAIS Merrill Center for Strategic Studies. Currently, he is a Research Associate with the Oxford Changing Character of War Centre, conducts programs in Latin America with the U.S. Center for Civil -Military Relations, and teaches international relations at UNM. He is writing a book titled The Blood of Others, about the origins and consequences of the wars at the end of the Cold War in Angola, Central America, and Afghanistan.

Location at Santa Fe Community College Board Room (#223).

The SFWAF Lunch is from 12:00 noon – 2:00 pm.

Cost for this lunch session is $25 for members and $35 for non-members. 

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You may pay by check made out to SFWAF and mailed to The Santa Fe World Affairs Forum, PO Box 31965, Santa Fe, NM 87594 or with a credit card using our Paypal account.

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Payment for this program is non-refundable after Thursday October 18 , 2018  if you are unable to attend. 

We strongly prefer that payment be made by Paypal or check postmarked by Thursday October 18 , 2018 at the latest to facilitate check in.

Dues reminder to SFWAF members. If you have not yet paid your dues you may include them in your payment for this program.  They are $60 per person or $110 per couple. 

Because we are a 501(c)(3) organization, dues and contributions are tax deductible.

For pricing and reservations, click here: http://www.sfwaf.org/payment/

The Speaker

Todd Greentree
Todd GreentreeA former U.S. Foreign Service Officer
Todd Greentreer, Todd Greentree has served in five wars, from El Salvador in the early 1980s to Afghanistan between 2008 and 2012.

Mr. Greentree graduated from the University of California Santa Cruz, received his master’s degree in International Studies from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), and his doctorate in history from Oxford University. He has taught Strategy and Policy at the Naval War College and the University of New Mexico and was a Visiting Scholar at the SAIS Merrill Center for Strategic Studies. Currently, he is a Research Associate with the Oxford Changing Character of War Centre, conducts programs in Latin America with the U.S. Center for Civil -Military Relations, and teaches international relations at UNM. He is writing a book titled The Blood of Others, about the origins and consequences of the wars at the end of the Cold War in Angola, Central America, and Afghanistan.

Where

The SFWAF Program will be in the:  The SFCC Board Room (#223) which is in the West Wing (Administration building) of the Santa Fe Community College.   Enter through the main entrance (on the left side of the building).  The Board Room is located on the corridor to the left of the Campus Center (or Food Court).  The college is located at 6401 Richards Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 87508.

Directions:  From Rodeo Road turn south onto Richards Avenue.  Turn into the campus main drive.  Parking lots are in front of the building.  The entrance to the West Wing is on the left just to the east of the flag poles.  Walk straight ahead almost to the cafeteria and take the corridor to the left.  The Board Room is on the right side.

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Parking

Where:
The Santa Fe Community College – Room (#233). The college is located at 6401 Richards Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 87508.

Directions:
From Rodeo Road turn south onto Richards Avenue.  Turn into the campus main drive.  Parking lots are in front of the building.  The entrance to the West Wing is on the left just to the east of the flag poles.  Walk straight ahead almost to the cafeteria and take the corridor to the left.  The Board Room is on the right side.

From I-25 take the Cerrillos Rd exit, then turn east onto Governor Miles Rd and then left onto Richards Avenue going south.

http://w2.sfcc.edu/files/maps/College-Loop2013.pdf